While You Were Offline: Trump Went Into North Korea

To begin with, a programming note: While you're reading this in its usual time slot, it was compiled before the July Fourth holiday, so—unfortunately—there's not a collection of tweets about President Trump's reportedly expensive Independence Day celebration. Apologies for that. Nonetheless, there's still a lot to catch up on. Last week was one that uncovered a secret Facebook group where immigration officials joke about migrant deaths, even as more and more people die in US custody and conditions at border facilities turn out to be worse than believed. It was also the week where the Trump administration let go of its quest to have a question about citizenship on the 2020 US census, and everyone continued to fall in love …

The Walking Dead (Comic) Is Over

Happy Fourth of July, and welcome to another edition of The Monitor, WIRED's pop culture news roundup. This time around we have big news about The Walking Dead comics and a lot of updates on the lives of directors, from long-timers like Quentin Tarantino to newcomers like Andy Muschietti. Lights, camera, action. The Walking Dead (Comic) Is Over Fans of The Walking Dead, ready your tissues: The comic book series, which serves as the basis for the AMC show, has come to a close. Creator Robert Kirkman and artist Charlie Adlard surprisingly wrapped up the series this week with The Walking Dead #193. The conclusion, which serves as an epilogue for the Rick Grimes story, came with little to no …

Archived TV interview may reveal identity of Banksy

Footage shows partly covered face of man who claims to be artist and seems to be working on two of his pieces A long-lost interview with a young man claiming to be Banksy, the worlds most famous anonymous street artist, has been found in a television companys vault. The interview was filmed before the elusive artists breakthrough Simon Hattenstone gave when he interviewed the artist in 2003: Bansky is white, 28, scruffy casual jeans, T-shirt, a silver tooth, silver chain and silver earring. He looks like a cross between Jimmy Nail and Mike Skinner of the Streets. Banksys people were unimpressed on Thursday saying only: No comment. We get loads of these.

Carrie Underwood: ‘I’d put on a happy face, then go home and fall apart’

As she prepares to take Glastonbury by storm, the country star opens a bottle of red wine and talks about the personal tragedy that coloured her new songs Saturday night on the banks of the Ohio River, and the most American of scenes is unfolding. At the Ball Park, the Cincinnati Reds are playing the Texas Rangers, while at the US Bank Arena next door American Idol, triumphing in the TV talent shows fourth season in 2005, Underwood has since recorded six albums, sold over 65m records, won seven Grammys, and earned more than $83m (65m). She is beautiful and blonde, and married to a retired ice hockey player: at first glance an unlikely addition to the Worthy Farm lineup. …

The Biggest News You Missed at E3 So Far

Hello, and welcome to a special edition of Replay, WIRED's videogame news roundup. This week we'll be doing a series of recaps of all the news coming out of E3, the massive gaming expo currently going down in Los Angeles. Each installment will bring you all of the announcements, trailers, gameplay, and leaks in one cozy, digestible format. Let's get started. Microsoft Shows Off a New Halo After a fairly uneventful Electronic Arts event on Saturday, the first big news out of E3 came on Sunday, when Microsoft took to the conference stage to unveil a bunch of new games, and finally, its next-gen console Project Scarlett, which is set to hit stores in the winter of 2020. We didn't …

Walt Whitman: celebrating an extraordinary life in his bicentennial

The poets life and works are being explored in three exhibitions in New York, the city that saw him create some of his most profound poems In July 1855, a pair of Scottish immigrant brothers, Andrew and Thomas Rome, published front cover, which made no mention of its author, critic for Life Illustrated claimed at the time. Readers cracked open Leaves of Grass to find an the body. Within weeks of the initial publication, Ralph Waldo Emerson Fanny Fern, Americas first professional female newspaper columnist job in the Department of the Interior in 1865, and was Walt Whitman: Americas Poet examines the people, places and experiences that most influenced Whitman. The Morgan Library & Museums Poet of the Body: New …

Siege: Trump under Fire by Michael Wolff review

Michael Wolffs second bite at the Trump presidency speculates on how the fiasco will end The Trump presidency began as Kim Jong-un, Michael Wolffs siege of Mafeking, let alone that of Leningrad. The war of attrition waged by Wolff and his fellow journalists has hardly worn Trump down; he retains the freedom of the air, tweeting out a daily barrage of lies and insults and jetting off to stoke up bigots in midwestern arenas or embarrass foreign heads of state who wince as they welcome him on to their soil. Mostly Siege retells scandalous stories that are pretty familiar, with few fresh disclosures. Despite the indiscreet tattle dribbled into his ear by the disgruntled Melania in hospital for a week …

Neal Stephenson’s Latest Book Dodges Its Scariest Premise

In its 880 pages, Neal Stephenson's Fall; or, Dodge in Hell navigates many of the themes the science fiction author has become known for. The history, and future, of science. How knowledge engenders power, and how that power perpetuates itself. How technologies that sound far-fetched are in fact inevitable, derived as they are from a centuries-long process of incremental breakthroughs. What’s unique to this go-round is that Stephenson’s pet ideas about our digital lives and afterlives overshadow his book's urgency. Nearly 30 years ago, Stephenson envisioned the metaverse; at the start of Fall, he sees a culture cleaved in two, its divisions reinforced by AR-enabled filter bubbles. It's a pressing, plausible future—and one Stephenson ultimately leaves unexamined. Early in Fall, …

Is Your Wobbly, Illegible Touchscreen Signature Still You?

Technology changes us as much as we change technology. It trains us to behave in certain ways, to modify how we speak or move to better accommodate its utility. In some cases, technology can transform the very things that define us. Perhaps the most literal example is our handwritten signature, a core talisman of identity. Developed in response to the ancient technology of paper and ink, it’s lately been confronted with the primacy of keyboards and screens. Think about how you most often sign your name, if you do at all: It’s not with a pen. Over the past decade, businesses have updated their points of sale with touch pads and styluses. Signing contracts increasingly happens electronically, where you either …

Aladdin Made $113 Million at the Box Office This Weekend

Hello, and welcome to a post-Memorial Day weekend edition of The Monitor, WIRED's pop-culture news roundup. What's in store today? First up, Disney's Aladdin had a pretty big weekend at the box office. Also, Netflix picked up a couple of big movies at the Cannes Film Festival, and there might be another Alien prequel coming. Here we go! Aladdin Made $110 Million-Plus at the Box Office This Weekend Looks like the genie granted Disney's wish. The studio's live-action remake of Aladdin scored big at the box office over Memorial Day weekend, bringing in an estimated $112.7 million domestically. It’s the fifth biggest opening weekend for the holiday. (Disney also holds the No. 1 spot in that category for Pirates of …

While You Were Offline: Trump and Pelosi’s War of Words Continues

Man, it's been a long week. Does anyone even remember it started with former White House counsel Don McGahn defying a congressional subpoena at this point? Or that the state of New York had effectively closed a legal loophole that would allow them to charge people President Trump pardoned on a federal level? Does anyone recall the glee that was felt around the unexpected return to national prominence of denied Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland? That happened last week as well! And then there was Facebook announcing it had quietly deleted almost 3.4 billion fake accounts in the last half year, while Twitter banned the Krassenstein brothers for operating fake accounts in an attempt to build an anti-Trump movement. Still, …

The lost Leonardo? Louvre show ditches Salvator Mundi over authenticity doubts

Art experts remain divided on the origins of the worlds most expensive painting , the worlds most expensive painting, will not be part of this years big Leonardo da Vinci show in Paris because curators at the Louvre do not believe it can be attributed solely to the artist, it has been claimed. The art historian and writer Ben Lewis has charted the remarkable story of a painting which made headlines all over the world when it sold for $450m (354m) at Christies in New York in 2017. Some of the worlds leading Leonardo experts, Martin Kemp, emeritus professor of art history at Oxford Mohammed bin Salman, who reportedly agreed that it would become a star of the Louvre Abu …

A billionaire is wiping out the debt of an entire 2019 college class. AOC says they shouldnt need an act of charity.

In an astonishing display of generosity, billionaire Robert F. Smith announced that his family is providing grants to wipe out the student debt of the entire 2019 class at Morehouse College. Smith made the announcement while giving a commencement speech at the all-male historically black college in Atlanta, Georgia on Sunday, May 19. It was met by an enthusiastic cheer from the 400 graduating seniors. “My family is going to create a grant to eliminate your student loans,” Smith said. According to the college, Smith pledges to donate $40 million to the graduates. Smith is the founder of Vista Equity Partners, a private equity firm with over $46 billion in assets. While Smith’s donation is an incredible show of generosity, …

The Sad Meaning Behind the Game of Thrones Coffee Cup Meme

Behold Ser Latte of House Starbucks, first of his name, guest at the table of Queen Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, hero of the worst Game of Thrones episode to date, "The Last of the Starks." We shall never see his likeness again, because HBO has already edited him into oblivion. But fret not; unlike his similarly missing brother, Ser Pounce, his time on the screen is not over. It's only just begun. Angela Watercutter The Game of Thrones Starbucks Cup: What's Inside? Laura Hudson Game of Thrones Recap: So Much for Breaking the Wheel Emily Dreyfuss The Case Against Watching the Rest of Game of Thrones People have been roasting Game of Thrones all week after a very anachronistic …

Donald Glover, Adidas, Nike, and the Fight for Cool

Recently, in a group chat, I expressed excitement over an unlikely piece of work: a new short film from Adidas. The sportswear corporation, which now also counts Beyoncé as a "creative partner," had teamed up with Donald Glover to make a series of vignettes featuring him and the actress Mo'Nique trading comic tête-à-têtes. Directed by longtime collaborator Ibra Ake, the film embodies Glover's typical patchwork: It's wonky, narratively indeterminate, and crammed with wit and the occasional inside joke. Jason Parham Ramy Is an Essential Voice for Millennial TV Jason Parham Lil Nas X's 'Old Town Road' Already Encapsulates 2019 Jason Parham When Black Horror Consumes Us The film, of course, wasn't just creativity for creativity's sake; it is essentially one …

Nobody Knows What Troll Means AnymoreLeast of All Mueller

Greetings, trolls of Reddit! Tell me: What’s a troll? “Memester that hates normies,” says suicideposter. “Someone who only interacts for reactions,” says _logic_victim. “Lives under a bridge, votes Republican,” says TW1971. (“no u,” replies Popcap101z, taking the bait, baiting the hook, or both. I can’t be sure.) Inside my brain (and in WIRED’s newsroom), when and where and why to use the word “troll” has become a point of agita, visited and revisited with each turn of the news cycle. So I found it interesting, and a little alarming, when Robert Mueller offered up his own definition last week: Trolls are “internet users—in this context, paid operatives—who post inflammatory or otherwise disruptive content on social media or other websites.” It’s …